By: Andrea Lapunzina Veronelli & Paola Aldrete

Mexico has been a long-time player in the investment arbitration system. At this writing, Mexico is party to 30 bilateral investment treaties (BITs) in force and is signatory to three other BITs that are not yet in force. It is also party to a number of treaties with investment provisions, of which the best-known example is the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). (SEE BELOW FOR SPANISH AND FRENCH VERSIONS).
Continue Reading

Published in the Global Arbitration Review, the chapter on the Enforcement of Foreign Arbitration Awards in Key Latin America Jurisdictions summarizes the arbitration law and practice of certain jurisdictions that have experienced an important development in the past 20 years in their arbitration landscape; they are also countries with significant economic growth. The countries in question are Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and Peru. This chapter focuses on the legislative efforts and the attitude adopted by the courts in these countries in regards to the recognition and enforcements of foreign arbitral awards. For full text, please click here.
Continue Reading

The first round of renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) will take place August 16 – 20 in Washington. The United States Trade Representative (USTR) will host a press conference to begin negotiations and will report out daily to the Industry Trade Advisory Committees (ITAC). The mechanics of the rest of the first round remain fluid – some working groups may table proposed text and engage throughout the week, while others may meet only briefly to establish a scope of work. The second round of talks is tentatively scheduled for September 10 in Mexico City.
Continue Reading

This is a guest post from The Cohen Group

Alfredo del Mazo of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (P.R.I.) is the presumptive winner of Sunday’s

election for governor of the State of Mexico, an important battleground state that will set the stage for the July

2018 Mexican presidential contest. The narrow win for the P.R.I. on President Enrique Peña Nieto’s home state

highlights the current weakness of the ruling party’s political machine, which won the state in 2011 with 60

percent of the vote. It also rescaled the overall popularity of populist presidential candidate Andres Manuel

Lopez Obrador (AMLO) who was able to pick the relatively unknown Delfina Gomez Alvarez as the candidate

for his National Regeneration Movement (MORENA) and almost win one of Mexico’s most coveted and

powerful elected offices. Going forward, how AMLO manages his party’s challenge of the election results

could impact his presidential ambitions.
Continue Reading